May 26, 2022

U.S Army Payroll Reaches $1 Billion in October

The U.S Army has reached a milestone, reaching $1 billion in payroll for October, which is up from $968 million in September and the highest it has been since last April. As of October 31st, there were 1.3 million active duty service members on the books, up from 1.2 million in September and close to the total of 1.4 million that were at this time last year. However, the number now is still down from the all-time high of 1.4 million back in June 2012.

The U.S Army has reached a milestone, reaching $1 billion in payroll for October, which is up from $968 million in September and the highest it has been since last April.

As of October 31st, there were 1.3 million active duty service members on the books, up from 1.2 million in September and close to the total of 1.4 million that were at this time last year. However, the number now is still down from the all-time high of 1.4 million back in June 2012.

The Army is number one when it comes to manpower in the U.S Department of Defense, with a total of 547,000 active duty service members, according to data from the DoD’s September 2014 manpower report. That’s more than the Air Force and Navy combined! The Army is followed by the Marine Corps at 195,000, the Air Force with 327,400 troops and the Navy with 323,600.

The Army has been downsizing since 2012 as part of a reduction from 570,000 to 490,000 by 2018. In 2013 there were 479,172 active duty soldiers on its books. The reductions have been slowing recently because of new challenges in the national security environment.

Previously, the Army’s goal had been reaching 490,000 by the end of 2015 but there were too many unknowns regarding how much force strength would be needed to properly do the job in the world today. The plan will result in a 40% smaller active component at full-strength.

The Army is streamlining many positions to reflect the current national security challenges and is aiming for a smaller, more lethal and agile force.

The changes include cutting about 17,000 civilian employees and decreasing end-strength by an additional 40,000 troops. The number of

Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno said the cuts had to be made in order for the Army to remain capable of fulfilling all our domestic and international responsibilities.

The goal is determined by weighing both regional threats and future capabilities. The number will reflect how many soldiers are needed to handle current challenges as well as predict future ones, such as dealing with threats in space and cyberspace. The Army’s main job is to protect the homeland, not fight in foreign wars.

The drawdown will also affect soldiers’ benefits such as healthcare costs and housing allowances, which are set to decrease by thousands of dollars a year for some troops. Soldiers who have been deployed more than once since 2001 will still get the same subsidized housing allowance until 2018. The Army will be looking at how to shift its health care system for soldiers and their families from a fee-for-service model to a network of more efficient, nonprofit providers who partner with the military – similar to what is expected in the civilian sector.